If you’ve ever wondered what’s inside electronic drums, cymbals, kick drums, and even sample pads, this video is for you! Drum Key Drill Bit*** Time Stamps: 1:15 GoEdrum Snare 3:17 Roland PD125 5:20 Roland PDX100 6:36 Tama Techstar 8:38 GoEdrum Cymbal 10:09 Kat Ride Cymbal 11:08 Roland CY12C 11:55 Kat Rubber Snare 13:17 GoEdrum…

Roland TD-25KV-S Electronic Drum Set Bundle with 3 Pairs of Sticks, Audio Cable, and Austin Bazaar Polishing Cloth


Features: 

  • Advanced SuperNATURAL sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • PDX-100 10-inch mesh-head snare pad with support for positional sensing and rim shot/cross stick playing
  • Three mesh-head tom pads: two PD-85BK 8-inch pads for rack toms and one PDX-100 10-inch pad for floor tom

New From: $2,499.99 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Roland High-performance, Mid-level Electronic V-Drum Set (TD-25K) with 10″ snare pad, 8″ tom pad (x3), 12″ crash v-cymbal, KD-9 kick pad, and MDS-9V stand (Electronics)


Features: 

  • Advanced Supernatural sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • PDX-100 10-inch mesh-head snare pad with support for positional sensing and rim shot/cross stick playing
  • Three mesh-head tom pads: two PDX-6 6.5-inch pads for rack toms and one PDX-8 8-inch pad for floor tom

New From: $1,999.99 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Roland Electronic Drum Modules, Black, Medium (TD-25) (Electronics)


Features: 

  • Supernatural sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • Enhance drum sounds with reverb, multi-effects, and EQ
  • Play along with WAV/MP3 songs and capture drum performances as audio tracks to a USB memory stick

New From: $999.99 USD In Stock
Used from: $999.99 USD In Stock

Roland TD-25K V-Drums Electronic Drum Set with Microfiber and Free EverythingMusic 1 Year Extended Warranty


Features: 

  • Advanced SuperNATURAL sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • PDX-100 10-inch mesh-head snare pad with support for positional sensing and rim shot/cross stick playing
  • Three mesh-head tom pads: two PDX-6 6.5-inch pads for rack toms and one PDX-8 8-inch pad for floor tom

New From: $1,999.99 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Roland TD-25K-S V-Drums Electronic Drum Set and DW-3000 Single Bass Pedal Bundle


Features: 

  • Advanced SuperNATURAL sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • PDX-100 10-inch mesh-head snare pad with support for positional sensing and rim shot/cross stick playing
  • Three mesh-head tom pads: two PDX-6 6.5-inch pads for rack toms and one PDX-8 8-inch pad for floor tom

New From: 0 Out of Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

ROLAND Electronic Drum Set TD-30KV (Electronics)


Features: 

  • Flagship V-Drums with advanced sensing technology and SuperNATURAL sounds
  • Expressive and accurate playability produced by Behavior Modeling
  • Professional V-Edit mode for customizing sounds
  • Solid stage set with metallic gray and black-chrome color finish
  • Hi-hat Stand, Hi-Hat Pedal, Kick Pedal and Snare Stand are not included

New From: $7,699.99 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Roland PK TD-25K-S Electronic Drum Set Package with Gemini DJX-07 Headphones, 3 Pairs of Sticks, Aux Cable, and Free Mobile Holder


Features: 

  • Package: Roland TD-25K Electronic Drum Set, MDS-9V Drum Stand, Gemini DJX-07 Headphones, 3 Pairs of Sticks, Aux Cable, and Free Mobile Holder
  • Dynamic, Expressive, Play-ability, and Quick Customization. Serious drummers can tap into high-end V-Drums playability in a mid-level kit for home and studio.
  • TD-25K-S Includes: Drum Sound Module TD-25 (1 Piece), V-Pad (Snare) PDX-100 (2 Piece), V-Pad (Tom1, Tom2) PDX-6 (2 Piece), V-Pad (Tom3) PDX-8 (1 Piece), V-Hi-Hat VH-11 (1 Piece), V-Cymbal Crash CY-12C (1 Piece), V-Cymbal Ride CY-13R (1 Piece), Kick Pad KD-9 (1 Piece), Drum Stand MDS-9V (1 Piece)
  • Play Along with Tracks and Record Audio Performances using a USB memory stick. The sound module is equipped with a USB host port
  • Gemini DJX-07 Processional DJ HeadPhones

New From: $1,999.99 USD In Stock
Used from: Out of Stock

Roland Entry-level Electronic V-Drum Set (TD-1K) (Electronics)


Features: 

  • Advanced Supernatural sound engine based on the flagship TD-30
  • Sound quality and expressiveness equivalent to the top-of-the-line V-Drums
  • Simple, logical interface for easily swapping and customizing each drum and cymbal in a kit
  • PDX-100 10-inch mesh-head snare pad with support for positional sensing and rim shot/cross stick playing
  • Three mesh-head tom pads: two PDX-6 6.5-inch pads for rack toms and one PDX-8 8-inch pad for floor tom
  • VH-11 V-Hi-Hat mounts on a standard acoustic hi-hat stand and offers realistic motion and a natural acoustic feel
  • CY-12C 12-inch crash cymbal with natural swinging motion, edge/bow sensors, and choke control; CY-13R 13-inch ride cymbal with natural swinging motion and edge/bow/bell triggering
  • KD-9 kick pad with cloth head for great feel and solid playability
  • Play along with WAV/MP3 songs and capture drum performances as audio tracks to a USB memory stick
  • Build drumming skills with the onboard Coach function

New From: $499.99 USD In Stock
Used from: $475.00 USD In Stock

Used & New Roland TD-25 on Ebay!
so in this video we’re gonna take apart a pile of different electronic drum pads mesh pads rubber pads cymbals kick drums snares just to see what’s inside and also talk a little bit about how they all work hey what’s up Justin here welcome to sixty five drums now I don’t know every single thing about the inner workings of electronic drums I’ll try to share what I know about them as I open each pad there were people in the comments that know way more about this stuff than me and you can tell everyone else the different information that maybe I missed so as much as I’d love to spend five hours painfully and slowly taking apart drums and putting them back together I want to speed up the process a little bit for the sake of the video which is why I have a drum key drill bit if you’ve never used one of these and you take apart drums and put on new mesh heads quite often I highly recommend getting one of these because they really speed up the process the only problem is the original one that I had right here it doesn’t actually stay in a drill because there’s no notch right here but I went on Amazon and bought a new set and hopefully this will be a little bit more useful okay so this is way more useful I can’t accidentally yank this one out of the drill so this is from DW it comes in a packet too and it’s like 15 bucks or something I’ll leave the amazon link in the description below if you’re interested okay so the first pad we’re going to take apart is this one from go a drum it’s dual zone 12 inches across and it’s a pretty heavy shell so this is made of steel and then it’s got some sort of like shell wrap on the outside of it it doesn’t have the original drum head on it because I removed that to put it on a kick drum that will be taken apart in a few minutes here but this is using a Joe Beck you three ply mesh head the older version that they had because it’s just what I had lying around I also have this one from Roland which we’re going to take apart later which is about the same size you can sort of see the differences and approach of how they build internals of these two pads okay so now this is opened up we can talk about the sensors inside it’s only got two you got a rim sensor and you have a drum head sensor this is what that sensor looks like it’s called a piezo some people call them piezos some people call them k Zoe’s not exactly sure who’s right there it’s a two-layer design and when force is applied to this piezo it generates an electric charge that electric charge comes from here via a quarter-inch cable over to your drum module the drum module then interprets that hits and figures out how hard you are playing and generates a MIDI note from that very very simple design these are like a buck each on like eBay you’ve got a small piece of like a fuzzy fuzzy material covering this piezo so you can’t see it and this one is in a sandwich a couple blocks of foam underneath and you have a couple blocks of foam on top and this is sandwiched in between those two elements now this is sitting on an L bracket on this shell right here and this has actually got a little bit of isolation because they have these tiny little cymbal felts underneath the where the L bracket is screwed into the shell itself this isn’t the greatest design of all time I’d rather this to be more in the center with a difference like a different arm from every single lug so you have more even force distribution and just in case you were wondering this is their eight-inch shell it’s got a very very similar design just the shower app is a little bit different and of course the size of the pad is different as well okay so the next pad is this one this is a role in PD 125 it’s the snare drum that comes on Roland T 30 KS and it’s not using the original mesh head on it just like the previous pad instead I have a two ply Blackheart dynamics mesh head right here I really wish heart dynamics didn’t go bankrupt it’s got the rubber rim on it the gooey drum pads they do have a rubber rim but it is so incredibly thin that it just breaks after one week of use and I’m not even kidding this one you kind of have to remove in order to get at these drum lugs because this is such a thick piece of rubber you can’t really use a drill or and it’s really hard to even use a drum key with this in the way but these are our pain in the butt to put back on your snare it’s just the way it is a thicker drum rim will be better and more durable but it’s also really hard to install so as you can tell I haven’t cleaned this in a very very long time it’s incredibly dirty but hopefully a can of air will help a little bit in this area yeah helped a little bit I’m not gonna spend ten minutes trying to clean this up so as you can tell this pad is drastically different from that go a drum one it’s got the plastic basket design also it’s center-mounted so not only is the drum head piezo right here underneath of it is also the rim piezo this can pick up positional sensing and the go a drum one cannot this is a much better design overpriced for what it is but it’s still a very very nice pad it’s never let me down and I do like this quite a bit there’s nothing really connecting this to the shell it’s just being held there by the force of you tightening down all the lugs that’s what the shell looks like it’s made of wood and this plastic basket helps like evenly distribute the force all the way around the rim and will probably be a little bit more accurate than the GUI drum one they’ve also seem to have these like little fins that sort of like a clip on to the rim a little bit and the drum head is more resting on this plastic piece than it is on the the wooden rim itself you can also remove this or just put it on a snare stand as well okay so the next pad from roll in that we’re going to take apart is the PD X 100 pad so don’t be fooled this is not exactly the same as the last one it looks completely different on the inside this is technically a newer generation so it’s supposed to give you slightly better triggering results even though it’s a little bit smaller and it doesn’t look quite as premium to me because it doesn’t have the shell or anything so let’s see what’s inside okay so finally we have a mesh head that I haven’t replaced yet this is the original one that came with this on a roll in TV 30k and this was back when Remo made every single mesh head for all of Roland’s pads which is not exactly the case anymore this is the internals of the pad very very simple look to it it’s just a plastic basket again but in this time they made like a shell for the plastic basket made out of plastic even though this is plastic this is actually very very heavy duty it’s kind of overpriced for what it is but man it’s very solidly built it gives great trigger accuracy and it actually has three different ways to mount this you can put this on a snare stand you can mount this on a drum rack with this right here and there’s also a third mounting option right there so yeah very versatile great little 10-inch pad and is very very accurate I also believe it has positional sensing enabled all right so the next pad is a Tama tech star pad I’ve actually already taken this apart in a dedicated video but I know not everyone has seen all 400 videos I’ve done so I thought it’d be interesting to take this apart and see how an eight easy drum pad compares to a current modern-day pad as you can see I’ve got this roll in power ply mesh head right here by the way if you didn’t know the power ply is just the same sort of mesh head they have on their regular drum sets that’s just a brand name they use to get people to buy them for acoustic drums and stuff for conversions anyway that doesn’t feel drastically different from the acoustic drum head why you ask it’s because you’re not really feeling the playing surface as much as what’s underneath of it so you got a very thin piece of foam right here it’s kind of dense but it’s kind of sort of reminds me of a mousepad and underneath of that you got this circular composite piece of wood I’ve got to be careful here because there’s a wire underneath of this and as you can see we’ve got one single piezo right here and it’s very very large it’s screwed into this this wood plates and there’s a very very thin piece of foam underneath of it and it’s a single zone design unfortunately there’s no REM piezo this is just the drumhead piezo and it’s sitting on top of these different like six pieces of foam thankfully we’ve gone far far away from this kind of design choice onto something that feels more acoustic like I’m going to put back on this acoustic drum head because honestly just looks way cooler when you’re using the original drum head so it kind of sucks when you’re trying to put this back together because the rim is so large that it’s covering up where all of these screws have to go in so you have to sort of like feel around and figure out where these screws go into so we’re gonna move on to kick drum pads in a little bit but let’s take a break from different drum pads and start taking apart some different cymbal pads to be honest I used to have two full sets of gooey drum cymbals and I threw away all of those cymbals except for this one because I couldn’t really trust them they kept breaking on me and you’ll see why in just a second okay so what you’re seeing right here are switches this is the second most common sensor that you’ll see in electronic drum pads they’re most commonly found in cymbals but you will see them inside of like some snares and tom pads from companies such as Yamaha and I believe Simmons uses them on the SD 2000 line as you can see right here you got one for the edge this is also a choke strip as well so when you pinch that it chokes off the sound and you have another switch for the Bell area right here now these can’t sense velocity they don’t know how hard you’re hitting the cymbal it’s an on/off switch which is why it’s called a switch it’s relying off of another piezo inside of here to tell how hard you’re hitting now unfortunately these switches right here back when I got them like in 2015 or something these were fall totally constructed and they would break it would basically always be on and so the cymbal would think that it was constantly being choked thus making it kind of useless and without a mod the cymbal would not be playable at all I don’t know if they’re any good now because this was years and years ago but that’s what happened with these these older cymbal types that I had all right so as you can see on the back of the symbol you have the two ribbons going to this little board right here and this is where the piezo is it looks very similar to what they’re doing on their drum pads as you can see that that looks very similar the same sort of foam square block right there and the actual symbol plastic piece kind of looks like a frisbee to be honest okay so next up we have one from cap percussion this is a three zone ride cymbal design it’s got the cap rakesh and gray look to it never was a fan of this color but let’s take a look inside and see how all this works the top of the cymbal is a big piece of plastic and then the playing surface is this zone right here which is made out of rubber all right so this is the inside of the back of a cymbal as you can see you got the output right there and you got the piezo it doesn’t have any sort of trigger foam or anything on it it’s just sitting right there with a piece of tape covering where the two cable wires are soldered to the piezo itself I believe this is glued on if so I’m not going to take it apart but we can at least try okay so unfortunately it is glued in so I’m not going to completely take off this piece of rubber but at least I can peel this back and you can see that’s where the edge switch is it’s that like creamish white looking strip that goes all the way around the first half of the cymbal and then that cable goes out right here and there’s going to be a matching one going around the bell okay so next up is a rolling cymbal this is a Cy 12c they only made one kind of housing for a lot of these symbols that way they could cut down on costs as you can see there’s actually another empty little soccer right there where this could be a three zone design if they put an extra input there and an extra sensor inside as you can see I’ve accidentally disconnected this ribbon cable it plugs in right about there but we got the piezo right there and it’s glued to this board and then of course that connects to the output right there I probably should put this back together I got to feed this right into this little little socket right there and if I can do that without destroying the symbol accidentally next up is a cat percussion rubber pad you had to do at least one of these because this is kind of like back where electronic drums used to be in the 90s and stuff so let’s take a look inside of one of these guys okay so this pad is a little bit more complicated than I thought it would be so it looks like this big piece of rubber isn’t the only thing going on inside of the pad so you do have this as a base but underneath of that you’ve got the circle piece of foam underneath of that you have this metal plate and on top of the metal plates it looks like we have a plastic plate this looks like glass but it’s not glass a big clear plastic plates and on top of that is the piezo and then we look at this we got the rim piezo on the bottom of the pad I’m interested to know why they decided to put a big metal plates is that a common thing inside of electronic rubber pads I’m not exactly sure I thought it was funny how this is using buttons to hold everything together you have the base you have the playing surface the white rubber piece and you actually have to feed these little buttons through this little hole and the rubber in order to keep it together and it is a pain in the butt okay so moving on to the next thing we’re gonna take apart a simple controller from go a drum now this is the one they’re most famous for it’s only 50 bucks and it works sort of like the cymbal controller inside of the VH 11 or VH 10 these are really really nice because of how cheap they are and they just do the job they also make one for Yamaha and one is compatible with rolling drum modules as well but I’m not going to take apart this one I’m going to take apart this one it’s the exact same thing but they’ve built it into like a bottom cymbal design for a hi-hat so you have this piece and then you put a regular cymbal on top of it and that turns it into a hi-hat if you want to use this with like a Cy 8 or something you can definitely do that that’s a very cheap way to make a hi-hat on an acoustic hi-hat stand really love this thing [Applause] okay so this is how it looks on the inside you have this which is one piece do you have a spring inside of that and this is the output Jack which is wired to this little board right here on the front of it we have a little piece that covers this right here and this is like a piston that goes up and down as you’re playing on the hi-hat stand this little piston seems to have a piece of metal that’s going out like this and it’s connecting to this little gizmo right here and as this goes up and down it’s running on a track on this little board right here and as it goes up and down on that track it generates a signal of some kind which then goes to the output the hi-hat is one thing that will make or break compatibility between different brands so for example you can’t use a Yamaha hi-hat with a rolling drum module just because they’re built completely different sometimes you can force like a snare to work with another brand stuff but you got to be really careful and really read the forums to figure out if the hi-hat from one brand you want to use still works with the drum module from a different brand so do your research before you start combining different high hats with different brands okay so next up we have a kick drum from Capra cushion I gotta say this is not my favorite pad of all time this is not very accurate for double kick stuff and it’s just not the greatest kick drum tower the most interesting thing about this for me is the fact that it has an acoustic drum head on it and it is very very loud and it looks like my drill is dying so I’m going to have to use the actual drum key like a heathen looks like you can remove that plastic rim okay so it looks like we have a big sandwich here we have this piece of foam on top we have a piece of foam on the bottom and in between is this metal plate and if you peel this back a little bit you’ll see it right there as well and the piezo is actually connected to the back of the plate and we’ve got these little circular sticky strips that are holding all this down against this frame right here a very very simple design and will take about five seconds to put it back together okay so the second kick-drum we’re going to take apart is the rolling Katie 1:20 this came on why I roll in TD 30k and this actually has that go eat ramesh head that I took from the first snare that we took apart and then I’ve got this drum tech Pro dot thing to protect the mesh head so I don’t accidentally tear through it later we’ve got a very large piece of foam right here that’s what makes this kick drum feel incredibly solid it also comes included with lots of dust because I haven’t cleaned this in eons you can actually buy replacements of this which I might want to do someday if you can see right here I don’t know how easy it is to see on camera but there’s two very large divots right here because I played past the point where I had ripped through one of my kick drum heads that’s why I really recommend buying one of these not the one from drum tech this thing is way too expensive just go to any drum store or Sweetwater or something and buy just a protector dot and that will really help save your mesh head in the long run especially if you use a kick drum beater that’s like like really thin and can accidentally dig into a mesh head that way this doesn’t happen in the moment you rip through mesh head you got to replace it right away don’t keep playing or else this will happen thankfully this isn’t the sensor this is just there to make the kick drum feel a little bit more solid this is the very single sensor in the entire drum it’s just a piezo with a foam cone on top of it very simple design but effective and it’s a very heavy kick drum as well and believe it or not I think the guy that invented the Roland Katie 120 actually works for a TV now finally the last thing we’re gonna take apart is a sample pad this is the ELISA sample pad Pro because it’s got a lot of different zones I’m gonna guess that it has quite a few PA Zoe’s inside of it it reminds me more of a laptop than the different electronic drum pads that we’ve been unboxing and tell them now as you can see there’s a lot of different boards inside of here I’ve got a lot of different cables going here the backside of this pad is where all the inputs are so as you can see there’s wiring to all of these guys and that’s why all these like cables are running back there there should be a lot of different piezas inside of here there’s one right there there’s one right there those are really small those are actually the smallest piezo I’ve actually ever seen and unfortunately this pad suffers from pretty bad crosstalk issues we really hit maybe one corner of the pad and for some reason the exact opposite corner of the pad will accidentally fire off a trigger but as you can see this is the square for one of the zones so this is another square for one of the zones I don’t really have anything incredibly innovative to say about this because I’m honestly out of my depth here but that’s what it looks like inside of one of these multi pads hopefully you had fun just taking a look inside of the different pads that I have lying around here thank you so much for watching and I hope you all have a great year [Music]
Used & New Roland TD-25 on Ebay!